how-to-choose-a-roof-for-your-home

How to choose a roof for your home?

From natural materials such as slate and wood to manufactured products such as asphalt, metal and plastic, there are more types and styles of Gikas Roofing Roofers to choose from today than ever before. While each has its advantages and disadvantages, they can all add a unique design element to your home.

Which one is right for you? What to look when constructing a roof?

  1. How long will it last?
  2. Can it withstand natural disasters such as fires and storms?
  3. Is it too heavy for the existing housing framework?
  4. Will the roof have enough slope?
  5. Will her appearance complement the style of the house?
  6. Are the materials environmentally friendly and recyclable?
  7. Is the type of housing allowed by the local building codes?
  8. And finally, how much will it cost?

Advantages and disadvantages of roofing

Some types of roofing in New Jersey may be better suited for your home than others. Factors such as the slope of the roof and the strength of the frame can limit your choices.

Listed below are the different types of roofing available

  • Asphalt tiles
  • Metallic
  • Plastic
  • Clay
  • Cement
  • Shale
  • Wooden
  • Asphalt

Asphalt tiles are the most popular type of roofing in New Jersey

Materials: Made of either organic paper fiber (better in cold weather and wind protection) or fiberglass (better for fire and moisture protection) impregnated with asphalt and coated with mineral grains.
Appearance: Available in traditional tiles with 3 ridges or in thicker tiles with laminates.
Eco-friendly: Non-environmentally friendly oil based product Can be recycled.
Durability: Not very durable compared to slate.
Weight: Moderate in weight.
Slope: Can be used on relatively low roof slopes and steeper.
Fire and wind: Good fire resistance, moderate to wind.
Cost: Low to moderate cost.

Metallic roofing

While metal is more expensive than asphalt, metal tile roofs last longer and are more wind resistant.

Materials: Can be made of steel, aluminum, copper or zinc alloy. Steel roofs have either a tin lining or a painted finish. Copper roofs are installed without finishing and need protection for the oxidation of copper over time.
Appearance: Available in sheets or tiles that look like other materials.
Environmentally friendly: They are made from recyclable materials and can be recycled when replaced. They absorb 33% less heat than asphalt.
Durability: Moderate to very durable, depending on the material.
Weight: Light.
Slope: Available for low and high slope roofs.
Fire and wind: Good resistance to fire and wind.
Cost: Moderate (steel) to expensive (copper).

Plastic roofing

These durable synthetic tiles look like either wood or slate.

Materials: They are made of high quality plastic polymer material.
Appearance: Made to look like wood or slate.
Environmentally friendly: Some are made from recyclable materials. They can be recycled when replaced.
Durability: They last a long time with low maintenance.
Weight: Light to medium weight.
Slope: Can be used on medium and high slope roofs.
Fire and wind: Good resistance to fire and wind.
Cost: Moderate.

Clay roofing

While they are fragile and heavy, clay tiles last a long time and are very fire resistant.

Materials: They are made of natural clay that has been burned in a kiln.
Appearance: Traditional Italian or Spanish appearance, can also be made to look like wood or slate.
Environmentally friendly: They are made of natural materials but require significant energy to build.
Durability: They last a long time with low maintenance but are fragile and break.
Weight: Heavy, requires a reinforced roof frame to support them.
Slope: Can be used on medium and high slope roofs.
Fire and wind: Excellent fire resistance, moderate to low wind resistance.
Cost: Large.

Cement roofing

Less expensive than clay, concrete tiles are also heavy but last a long time and are very fire resistant.

Materials: They are made from a mixture of cement and sand.
Appearance: They can be made to look like traditional clay tiles, wood or slate.
Environmentally friendly: They are made of natural materials but require significant energy to build.
Durability: They last a long time with low maintenance but can break.
Weight: Heavy, reinforced roofing frame required to support them.
Slope: Can be used on medium and high slope roofs.
Fire and wind: Excellent fire resistance, moderate to low wind resistance.
Cost: Moderate.

Shale roofing

Slate is one of the oldest roofing materials. Although fragile and expensive, it is very durable and has good resistance to both fire and wind.

Materials: Made of natural slate.
Appearance: Usually dark gray in color and irregular in appearance.
Environmentally friendly: Made from natural materials.
Durability: They last a long time, durable.
Weight: Heavy, requires a reinforced roof frame to support them.
Slope: Can only be used on high slope roofs.
Fire and wind: Good resistance to fire and wind.
Cost: Very expensive. Specially trained workers are required for their installation.

Wooden roofs

Wood tiles are made of rot-resistant wood but have low fire resistance.

Materials: They are usually made of cedar, but can also be made of other types of wood that are resistant to rot.
Appearance: They have a natural appearance and are silver and gray.
Environmentally friendly: Made of natural materials.
Durability: They have a short lifespan and require periodic maintenance.
Weight: Moderate in weight.
Slope: Can be used on medium and high slope roofs.
Fire and wind: Good wind resistance, poor fire resistance.
Cost: Moderate

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